Lung Cancer Screening Rates Remain Very Low Among Current and Former Smokers
 
Lung Cancer Screening Rates Remain Very Low among Current and Former Smokers
 

Lung cancer screening rates remained very low and unchanged among eligible populations in 2015, despite recommendations that high risk current and former smokers be screened. The study by American Cancer Society investigators appears in JAMA Oncology. The authors say it underscores the need to educate clinicians and those at risk about lung cancer screening.

In December 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended annual screening for lung cancer using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) for people ages 55 to 80 with at least a 30 pack-year smoking history (calculated by multiplying the number of packs of cigarettes smoked per day by the number of years the person has smoked). The recommendation came after the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) showed screening this high risk population could reduce lung cancer mortality 20% in this population.

In 2010, before the recommendation, the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) found only 2% to 4% of high risk smokers received LCDT in the previous year.

To investigate further, researchers led by Ahmedin Jemal DVM, PhD, compared responses from the National Health Intervi